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—the final evacuation is effected. English government will provide for their return to France, which shall take place by detachments of about one hundred and fifty or two hundred men at a time. A sufficient number of French medical officers shall be left behind to attend them.—X. As soo; as the vessels employed to carry the army to France shall have disembarked it in the horbours specified, or in any other of the ports of France to which stress of weather may force them, every facility shall be given them to return to England without delay, and security against capture until their arrival in a friendly port.—XI. The French army shall be concentrated in Lisbon, and withiu a distance of about two leagues from it. he English army will approach within 'three leagues of the capital, and will be so placed as to leave about one league between the two armies.—XII. The forts of St. Julien, the Bugio, and Cascais shall be oc. cupied by the British troops on the ratification of the convention. Lisbon and its citadel, together with the forts and batteries, as far as the Lazaretto or Trofuria on one side, and fort St. Joseph on the other, inclusively, shall be given up on the embarkation of the second division, as shall also the harbour and all armed vessels in it of every description, with their yogging, sails, stores, and ammunition. The fortresses of Elvas, Almaida, Peniche, and Pimela, shall be given up, as soon as the Briti-li troops can arrive to occupy them. In the meantime the general in chief of the British army will give notice of the present convention to the garrisons of those places, as also to the troops before thea), in order to put a stop to all further bostilities. - X; If Commissaries shall be named on both sides, to regulate and accelerate the execution of the arrangements agreed upon.-K. V. Should there arise dodots as to the negoing of any gricie, it wiłł be explained fivourably to the French army. —XV. From the date of the ratification of the present convention, all arrcars of contributions, requisitions, or claims what over, of the French government, against subjects of Portugal, or any other individēal, residing in this country, founded on the occupon of Portugal by the French troops in the month of Dec. 1807, which may not have been o' up, are cancelled, and all sequestrations laid upon their property in overbie or in moveable, are removed,

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moveable and immoveable, shall be respected, and they shall be at liberty either to accompany the French army, or to remain in" Portugal. In either case their property is guaranteed to them, with the liberty of retaining or disposing of it, and passing the produce of the sale thereof into France; or any other country where they may fi their residence, the space of one year beio allowed them for that purpose.--It is ful understood that shipping is excepted from this arrangement, only, however, in so f as regards leaving the port ; and that not of the stipulations above-mentioned can made the pretext of any commercial spec lation.--XVII. No native of Portugal sh be re; idered accountable for his political co duct during the period of the occupation the country by the French army and those who have continued in the exercise their employments, or who have accept situations under the French overnme are placed under the protection of the B tish commanders: they shall sustain injury in their persons or property, it n having been at their option to be cbedie or not to the French government; they also at liberty to avail themselves of : stipulations of the 16th article.—XVI The Spanish troops, detained on board s in the port of Lisbon, shall be given top the contpánder-in-chief of the British a who engages to obtain of the Spaniards to r tore such French subjects, either military civil, as may have been detained in Spain wit out being taken in battle, or in consequen of military operations, but on occasion the occurrences of the 29th of last M: and the days immediately following.—XI There shall be an immediate exchange es' blished for all ranks of prisoners nade i Portugal since the commencement of present hostilities.—XX. Hostages of to rank of field-officers slall be mutually fo nished on the part of the British army 3. navy, and on that of the French army, f the reciprocal guarantee of the present co vention. The officers of the British arm shall be restored on the completion of th articles which concern the army ; and 1 officers of the navy on the disembarkati, of the French troops in their own countri The like is to take place on the part of to French army.—XXI. It shall be allowed to the general in chief of the French army to send an officer to France with intelligencio of the present convention. A vessel wo be furnished by the British admiral to convey him to Bourdeaux and Rochefort.—

|x|, The British admiral will be invited to occommodate his excellency the colnmurder-in-chief, and the other principal offers of the French army, on board of this, of war—Done and concluded at Lisbothis 30.hday of August, 1808. (Signed) Giorge MURRAY, quarter-master-general. KELLERMANN, le général de division. Nous slic D'Abranies, général en chef * I'armée Française, avons ratifié et ratiios la présente convention définitive dans Asses articles, pour Ctre exécuté selon sa me et teneur. (Signé) Le Duc |ARRANTEs. – Au quartier général de ibune, le 30 Août. isional Articles to the Convention of o August 30. Art I. The individuals in the civil employent of the army, made prisoners, either the British troops, or by the Portuguese, iny part of Portugal, will be restored as customary, without exchange.--il. The ch army shall be subsisted from its own zines, up to the day of embarkation ; garrisons up to the day of evacuation of fortresses. The remainder of the maga3 shall be delivered over in the usual f to the British government, which ges itself with the subsistence of the and horses of the army from the abovetioned periods, till their arrival in o, under the condition of their being bursed by the French government for ocess of the expense beyond the estition to be made by both parties, of the pe of the magazines delivered up to the fish army.—The provisions on board the * of war in possession of the Trench o, will be taken on account by the fish government, in like manner with magazines in the fortresses.—III. The al commanding the British troops will *the necessary measures for re-establishthe free circulation of the means of subonce between he country and the capital. one and concluded at Lisbon, this 30th

The tected. Their property of every kind.

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this office, with dispatches from the admiral to the Ion. Wellesley Pole, of which the following are copies : Hifornia, off the Tagus, Sept. 3, 1808. Sir, Inclosed here with, for the inforthat ion of the lords commissioners of the admiralty, is a copy of a convention,” entered into by lieut. col Murray, and gen." Kellermann, for the evacuation of Portugal by the French army ; such convention having been ratified by licut. gen, sir Hew Dalrymple, myself, and the French commander-in-chief, British troops, consisting of the 3d and 42d regiments, were on the 2d instant landed, to occupy the forts of Cascais, St. Antonio, St. Julien, and the Bugio, and no time shall be lost to embark the French troops, agreeably to the said convention.—Captain Halsted, first captain of this ship, and captain of the fieet, who is now the bearcrof dispatches to their

lordships, respecting the Russian squadron

in the Tagus, is in foil possession of my confidence, and will be able to explain to th.ir lordships the moives inducing me to ratify the convention in question, as well as give any further information that may be thought necessary.—I have, &c. (Signed) CHA Roo. Es Cotto N. * A copy of the convention inclosed in the letter fron, Sir Hew Dalrymple. Hibernia off the Tagus, 4th Sept. 1sos. Sir, -osiere with I have the honour to inclose to you, for the information of the lords cott, thissioners of the “doiralty, a copy of a convention entered into by me with vice admiral Seniavin, commanding the Russian fleet in the Tagus; by which it will appear to their lordships, that such fleet has been surrendered to me, to be held by his unajesty as a deposit, until six months after the conclusion of a peace between Russia and Fingland.—I have charged cap- . tain Halsted, first captain of the Hibernia,

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blockade (by whom every exertion has been made with a degree of cheerfulness doing them infinite honour,) I feel extremely grateful, and deem it my duty to offer every possible testimony of my approbation in their favour.—I have, &c. (Signed) C. Cotton. 4rticles of a Convention entered into letween Vice Admiral Seniavin, Knight of the Order of St. Alerander, and other Russian Orders, and Admiral Sir Charles Cotton, Bart. for the Surrender of the Russian Fleet, now anchored in the River Tagus. . Art. I. The ships of war of the emperor of Russia now in the Tagus as specified in the annexed list, shall be delivered up to admiral sir C. Cotton, immediately, with all their stores as they now are, to be sent to England, and there held as a deposit by his Britannic majesty, to be restored to his imperial majesty, within six months after the conclusion of a peace between his Britannic majesty, and his imperial majesty the emperor of all the Russias.-II. Vice-admiral Seniavin, with the officers, sailors, and marines, under his command, to return to Russia without any condition or stipulation respecting their future services; to be conveyed there in men of war, or proper vessels at the expence of his Britannic majesty. —Done and concluded on board the ship Twerday, in the Tagus, and on boyd his Britannic majesty's ship Hibernia, off the mouth of that river, the 3d day of Sept. 1808. (Signed) DE SENIAvin. Charles Cotton. (Counter-signed by command of the admiral), L. Sass, assesseur de college. (Counter-signed by command of theadmiral), JAMEs Ken NEDY, secretary. Lists of the Ships referred to in the foregoing Convention. Twerday, vice-admiral Seniavin, captain du 1st rang Melayoff, of 74 guns, and 736 men.—Skoroy, captain du 1st rang Schelling, of 60 guns, and 524 men.—Ste. Helene, captain du 2d rang Bitchenscoy, of 74 guns and 598 men —S. Cofael, captain du 2d rang Roshnoff, of 74 guns, and 610 men.—Ratvizan, captain du 2d rang Rtishchoff, of 66 guns, and 549 men. — Silroy, capt. lieut. Malygruin, of 74 guns, and 604 men.—Motchnoy, capt. lieut. Rasvosoff, of 74 guns, and 520 men.—Rafael, capt. lieut. Bytchenskoy, of 80 guns, and 646 men.—Fregatte Kiidlyn, capt. lieut. Douri off, of 26 guns, and 222 men— Yarow slaval, captain du 5d rang Milkoff, of 74 gos, and 507 men. Total 5085 men. (Signed) MAliverp, le capitaine de Pavillon.

SPANish Revolution.—(Continued from page 486).-Wictories in Saragosia. From the Oviedo Gazette Extraordinary, Aug. 23, 1808. Saragossa, a town which we cannot mention without the most lively emotion, has completely humbled to the dust the losty eagles of the French. The arms of the French did not find there an Ulm, but a St. Jean d'Acre. Let us, therefore, contribute to preserve the memory thereof, by publish. ing the following official papers and manifestoes:— - Most Serene Sir, –The enemy, after to many obstinate and fruitless attacks on this city, renewed the bombardment on the 3d and 4th instant, throwing a great number} of bombs into the place, and doing consider. able damage. On the 4th, without discon-Ho tinuing the bombardment, they attacked with twelve pieces of cannon, one of out batteries, and after the most glorious defence, which lasted untill eight o'clock, the enemy carried the battery, and entered theo town ; yet without getting possession of out; artillery, which we saved.—In the neighbouring streets the enemy met with the most vigorous resistance, and the slaughter: was so great among them, that the remem' brance of this action must at all times prowth. extremely painful to them. They are con. fined to a small space which they occupy is the city, and, with the troops which I exo pect from Valentia, within two days, I hop; I shall be able to give a good account of the enemy's corps, whose defeat will administ: comfort to the inhabitants, whose intrepid firmness I admire. They will forget their past and present sufferings, and I shall so perfectly consoled. God preserve your .. ness many years!—Joseph Dr PALAFox Melz 1. Head quarters, Saragossa, Aug. 10, 1808. To the Lord of the Supreme Council of Asturias. Most Serene Sir, I have the satisfaction to inform your highness, that the French army, which for these two months has in: flicted the severest sufferings on this city, and whose conduct has been most abomi" nable, fled this morning at break of dās, leaving in our possession an immensequanti's of artillery, ammunition, provisions, and other effects. During the night, the enemy made a fresh attack within, the city, from the small space which he accupied: but he was routed by the valiant defended of this town, and his defeat was so com: plete, that he fied with the utmost precip: tation.—This very night a division of 400° excellent troops moved from this place"

cut off the enemy's retreat through Navarre, where they will be joined by other troops and the arumed peasantry of that country; and the 6000 meu that I expect to-morrow from Valentia, joined by 4900 men of the army formed on Catalay-ad, will, I trust, be able to overtake the enemy's rear, in order to chastise and prevent them from committing on this march their usual robberies and vexations.—This fortunate event has been this day celebrated with the ringing of bells, and to-morrow the Te Deum will be sung to offer up thanks to the Most High.-It is of great importance to accelerate the meeting of the deputies of all the provinces of Spain, and I think it would be expedient to appoint for that purpose a day in the next month of September. I have given the iame advice to the rest of the general and jupreme councils in the whole kingdom ; ind should you coincide with me in opinion on this subject, I hope you will acquaint me with it.—Joseph Dr. PALArox Y Melzi. Head-quarters, Saragossa, Aug. 13, 1808. Manifesto, dated Head-quarters, Saragossa, Aug. 15.

After so many days of pain and affliction, he period has at length arrived, which I ould expect, from the firmness and valour with which you have defended this illustrious apital.—Having witnessed the shameful light of the French slaves, who have abanoutd. the artillery, ammunition, and proisions, which their detestable rapacity had leaped up, let us now perform our principal uty, and offer up thanks to the Omnipotent who has inflicted condign punishment on hose wretched soldiers who profane the timples, outrage the sacred images of the livinity; and are such strangers to morality, hat they are not worthy to have any interourse with the rest of mankind. Let us ave their emperor to the remorse and afflicions which are the lot of the wicked, and *eech the Most High, that he may vouchife to bless again our arms, that the two rmies which are in pursuit of the fugitive obbers, may complete their destruction.— the fields of Saragossa, its gates, and even to streets, are stained by the blood of 2000 Frenchmen, who have paid with heir lives for the temerity of their chief. This is the fruit which the French have eaped from their entrance in Arragon. All Europe, nay, the universe, will hear with horror the names of their generals Le Febvre and Verdier, who, unmindful of the good leatment which the French prisoners, and ill the natives of France experienced in Arraon, have committed the utmost atrocities. lity very justly appreciated the difference

between the system of an ambitious and treacherous government, and that of a nation which cements its felicity by the fairest principles of justice, and considers not as real enemies those who took no share in the delicious combat of their government. France will long deplore the calamities which the war with Spain has prepared for her; and cannot recollect, without the deepest sense of shame, the means employed to carry it on.—Husbandmen, artizans, orphans, aged and religious persons, ye who have been reduced to indigence and misery in consequence of your fields being fired, your houses destroyed, and your property, which, however small, constituted your whole fortune and all your comfort, robbed by the French, be easy ; you have the good fortune of living in Spain, and yours is the glory to have defended the capital of Arragon, whereby our enemy was prevented from desolating the rest of this beautiful province: you bore up with resignation under your sufferings, and disregarded your private interest in order to promote the general good. I cannot look with indifference on deeds of heroism like yours, nor omit any opportunity of procuring you relief. I have very particulatly charged the intendant general of the kingdom, D. Lorenzo Calbo, as soon as the most pressing occupation of the present period shall permit it, to relieve your wants by every means in his power ; and I depends on the generous feelings of all Spaniards, and on the liberal sentiments of our beloved king, that all possible exertion will be made to indemnify you for your sufferings and losses.-Palafox. Manifesto of the Junta of Seville, August 3, 1808. The defence of our country, and of our king, that of our laws, our religion, and of all the rights of man, trodden down and violated, in a manner which is without example, by the emperor of the French, Napoleon I. and by his troops in Spain, compelled the whole nation to take up arms, and to chuse itself a form of government; and in the difficulties and dangers into which the French had plunged it, all, or nearly all, the provinces, as it were by the inspiration of heaven, and in a manner little short of miraculous, created supreme juntas, deliwered themselves up te their guidance, and placed in their hands the rights and the ultimate fate of Spain — The effects have hitherto most happily corresponded with the designs of those who formed them. The provinces have armed themselves; some have formed large armies of veteran troops, and have uuited to them the enlisted pea

sants; all, or nearly all, have fought and are fighting against the French in behalf of their king, Ferdinand VII. with a vaiour and a constancy, of which neither Greece, nor Rome, nor any other nation of the world, had any idea. The French are realiy amazed and terrified, and the hopes of conquering them are as sure as human certainty can reach.-The only thing which can impair or frustrate them, is discord, and the want of union among the provinces themselves. Hence the supreme junta paid its first attention to remove that danger, withwhich view it printed aid published the official paper, entitled Precautions, which it communicated in every possible manner to all the provinces of Spain. The bringing this plan to perfection, and carrying it into complete execution, is now more than ever necessary. Our enemies are anxious to forment our divisions. Human passions, personal interests ill understood, the ignorance, the weakness, the blindness of mon, may, perhaps, without their knowing it, assist the evil designs of our enemies, and thus destroy a beginning so glorious, and facilitate and consummate the entire ruin of Spain. This it is that we are endeavouring to guard against, urged only by the most sacred motives, by our honour, by our loyalty as affectionate subjects, by our duty as Spaniards, by our faith as Christians; and here we protest before God and man, whose aid we invoke with all fervency, that we will write nothing but what is dictated to us by the love of our country, the preservation of our king, and of our rights, not mingling with it any thing that appeals to partake of passion, of interest, or of any other personal motive ; but being always ready to hear the opinions of the other provinces, and to amend our own errors, wherever it shall be shewn that we have committed any.—Be it the chief care to avoid every thing which is not absolutely necessary, and which may serve to sow the seeds of disunion in the provinces, and to excite divisions among them; and of this nature we esteem all corversations about the royal house, and of the order of succession in different families which derive a right from it. There is no person so ignorant of the history of Spain, and of the unaåner in which the throne has been occupied, as not to know the changes which have taken place in the succession. It is also known what are the legislative proceedings upon this point; what the manner in which endeavours were used to introduce

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an alteration into them ; the different pretexts for this alteration ; and, lastly, the final settlement which was made by the cortes of 1789, and which ought in future to be the rule.—But are we in a situation to talk of these matters ? Long live our king and indisputable sovereign Ferdinard VII. and long live his a gust brothers, heirs of the crown, after his attested decease. Why then anticipate those enquiries which can only be necessary in default of these ? This anticipation may produce, by the diversity of opinions which it creates, a cruel cisunion, which, of itself alone, will utterly ruin the only aim and onject which Spain at present has in view, and that is, its own eutire and independent preservation for its so: vereign lord and king, Ferdinand VII and his utidisputed successors; and, with its king, the preservation of its own rights and

laws, and the unity of the holy Roo an Ca

tholic apostolical religion, which it has gloriously professed and defended for so many ages. It is therefore, boh absurd and dangerous to dispute about the soccession in cases evidently remote; all the provinces of Spain ought to confine thenisei.es in this respect to this general expression- “Heredira- or succession according to the fundamental laws of the monarchy.”—Not so is it with the second question moved by the various jui.; as of the kingdom, which certainly keeps the people in a state of disquietude and agitation, is the continual object of public conversation, and may produce division fital to the gene. rous design, and the virtuous obligation into which we have entered of defending ourselves against our enemies, and of preserving our country, our king, our monarchy, our laws, and our religion. This second question is— is there a necessity for creating a supreme government, which may unite the sovereign authority of all the provinces, till the restitution of king Ferdinand to his throne * This supreme junta declares openly, that from the beginning to the present time it has been persuaded that such a supreme government is altogether necessary, and that without it the country is in danger, and its enemies will find means of coopeting its ruin; and the reasons of this deterinimation and declaration are so evident, and present themselves with such clearness to the eyes of all, that they cannot fail of convincing all who have the least notion of public affairs, or a correct insight into the nature of man, the passions which move him, and the order of human affairs in all ages. (Tote continued.)

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Printed by Cox and Baylis, Great Quéen Street; published by R. Bagshaw, Brydges Street, CoventGalden, where former Numbers may be had : sold also by J. Budd, Crown and Mitre, Pall-Mail.

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