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Victor r of THE BRITIs H ARMY IN Porrugal. From the London Gazette Lt. traordinary. . . . Downing-Street, Srpt 2, 1808–Dispatches, of which the following are copies and extracts, were last night received from lieut. gen. sir Harry Burrard, and lieut. gen, sir Arthur Wellesley, dated from head-quarters, at Lourinha, addressed to viscount Castlereagh, one of his majesty's principal secretaries of state, and brought by capt. Campbell, aid-de-camp to sir A. Wellesley: Extract of a Letler from Lieut.-Gen. Sir A. isellesley, dated Head-Quarters, at Caldas, the ...}} Aug. 1808. - - I marched, from Lyria on the 13th, and arrived at Aliobaça on the 19th, which place the enemy had abandoned in the preceding night; and I arrived here yesterday. The enemy, about 4000 in number, were posted about 10 miles from hence, at Borica; and they occupied Brilos, about 3 miles from hence, with their advanced posts. As the possession of this last village was important to our future operations, I determined to occupy it ; and as soon as the British infantry arrived upon the ground, I directed that it might be occupied by a detachment, consisting of 4 companies of riflemen of the 60 and 95th regiments. The enemy, consisting of a small piquet of infantry and a few cavalry, Riade a trifling resistance and retired; but they were for lowed by a detachment of our riflemen to . the distance of 3 miles from Brilos, The riflemen were then attacked, by a superior body of the enemy, who attempted to cut them off from the main body of the detachnient to which they belonged, which had now advanced to their support; larger bodies of the enemy appeared on both the flanks of . the detachment, and it was with difficulty that maj gen. Spencer, who had gone out to CEbidos when he had heard that the riflemen had advanced in pursuit of the enemy, was enabled to effect their retreat to that village. They have since remained in possession of it, and the enemy have retired entirely from the neighbourhood —In this

fittie affair of the advanced posts, which

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(with the exception of: riflemen detached with thaj.gen. Peokon), and 400 Portu.

guese light infantry, the British and Portu.

guese cavalry, a brigade of nine-pounders, and a brigade of six-pounders, were destined to attack gen. Laborde's position in front— The columns being formed, the troops moved from CEbidos about 7 in the morning. Brig. gen. Fane's riflemen were immediately detached into the hills on the left of the valley, to keep up the communication between the centre and left columns, and to protect the march of the former along the valley; and the enemy's posts were succes. sively driven in. Maj. gen. Hill's brigade, formed in three columns of battalions, moved on the right of the valley, supported by the cavalry, in order to attack the enemy's left; and brig, generals Nightingale and Craufurd moved with the artillery along the high road, until at length the former formed in the plain immediately in the enemy's front, supported by the light infantry com: panies, and the 45th regiment of brig. gen. Craufurd's brigade, while the two other regiments of this brigade (the 50th and 91st), and half of the 9-pounder brigade, were kept as a reserve in the rear.—Maj. gen. Hill and brig. geh. Nightingale advanced upon the enemy's position, and, at the same monient, brig. gen, Fane's riflemen wer in the hills on bis fight ; the Portuguese in . ty in a village upon his left; and maj. gen. Ferguson's column was descending from the heights into the plain. From this situation the enemy, retired by the passes into the mountains with the utmost regularity and the grotest celerity; and notwithstanding th; rapid advance of the British infantry, the wintofa sufficient body of cavalry was the

the cause of his suffering but fittie loss in

the plain.—It was then necessary to make a

disposition to attack the formidable position |

which he had taken up. Brigadier-general

Fane's riflemen were already in the noun

tains on his right, and no time was lost in attacking the different passes, as well to support the riflemen as to defeat the enemy completely.—The Portuguese infantry were ordered to move up a pass on the right of the whole; the light companies of maj. gen. Hill's brigade and the 5th regiment moved up a pass next on the right ; and the

29th regiment, supported by the 9th under big gen. Nightigie, a third pass; and

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ese passes were all difficult of

occess, and some of them were well defend

to by the enemy, particularly that which was attacked by the 29ta and 9th. These regiments attacked with the greatest impetuonly, and reached the enemy before those whose attacks were to be made on their *uks: the defence of the enemy was des

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perate, and it was in this attack principally that we sustained the loss which we have to lament, particularly of that gallant officer, the hon, lieut. col Lake, who distinguished himself upon this occasion.—The enemy, was, however, driven from all the positions he had taken in the passes of the mountains, and our troops were advanced in the plains on their tops. For a conside able length of time the 29th and oth regiments alone were advanced to this point, with brig. gen Fane's riflemen at a distance on the left, and they were afterwards supported by the 5th regiment, and by the light companies of maj. gen. Hill's brigade, which had come up on their right; and by the other troops ordered to ascend the mountains, who came up by degrees. The enemy here made three most gallant attacks upon the 29th and 9th regiments, supposed, as I have above stated, with a view to cover the retreat of his defeated army; in all of which he was, however, repulsed; but he succeeded in effecting his retreat in good order, owing, principally, to my want of cavalry, and secondly, to the difficulty of bringing up the passes of the mountains with celerity, a sufficient number of troops, and of cannon, to support those which had first ascended. The loss of the enemy has, however, been very great; and he left three pieces of cannon in our hands. –I cannot sufficiently applaud the conduct of the troops throughout this action. The enemy's positions were formidable, and he took them up with his usual ability and celerity, and defended them most gallantly. But I must observe, that although we had such a superiority of num

| bers employed in the operations of this day,

the troops actually engaged in the heat of

, the action were, from unavoidable circum

stances, only the 5th, 9th, 29th, the riflemen of the 95th and 00th, and the flank companies of maj. gen. Hill's brigade,

being a number by no means equal to that

of the enemy; their conduct, therefore, deserves the highest commendation.—I cannot avoid to take this opportunity of expressing my acknowledgements for the aid and support I received from all the general and other officers of this army. I am particularly indebted to maj. gen. Spencer for the advice and assistance I received from him: to maj. gen. Ferguson for the manner in which he led the left column, and to maj. gen, Hill, and brig. generals Nightingale and Fame * for the manner in which they conducted the different attacks which they led. I denved most material assistance asso from lieut. col. Tucker and lieut. col. Bathurst, in the offices of deputy-adjutant and deputy-quarter-mas

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ter general, and from the officers of the staff employed under them. I must also mention that I had every reason to be satisfied with the artillery, under lieut. col. Robe I have the honour to be, &c.— (Signed) A Frtiu R Wellesley. Return of the Killed, s/ounded, and Mis"sing of the Army under the Command of Lieut. Gen. the Right Hon. Sir 21 of elies!es, K. B. on the 17th of Aug. . 1 SOS.—Head Quarters, Lourinha, dug. 18, 1808. Gen. Stoff, 1 capt. R. leu.-Royal Artillery, 1 c, p: killed ; ; rank and file wounded.—Royal Engineers. 1 capt wounded. 1st Brigade, Maj Gen. Hill.—5th Foot, 3 rank and file killed ; 1 major, 1 lieut. 2 serjeants, 39 rank and sole wounded.—0th Foot, rank and file killed ; 1 lieut. col. 1 maj. I capt. 1 ensign, 3 serjeants, 4') rank and file wounded ; 12 rank and file missing. —38th Foot, 4 rank and file wounded. 2d Brigade, Maj. Gen. Ferguson.—20th Foot, none killed or wounded.—40th Foot, 1 rank and file killed ; 2 rank and file wounded.—7 ist Foot, 1 rank and file killed ; 1 rank and file wounded. 3d Brigade Brig. Gen. Nightingale.—29th Foot, 1 lieut col 2 serjeants, 3.1 rank and file killed ; I naj. 3 caps 3 lieuts, 6 serjeants, 105 rank and file wounded ; 1 capt. 3 lieuts. 1 serjeant, I drummer, 32 lauk and file missing.—82d Foot, 6 rank and sile killed; 1 lieut. I serjeant, 17 rank and file wounded. 4th Brigade, Brig.-Gen Bowes —6th Foot, I captain, 2 rank and file wounded ; 1 rank and file missing.—32d Foot 1 rank and file killed ; 3 rank and file wounded. 5th Brigade, Brig. Gen Craufurd. —45th Foot, 1 easign killed; 1 lieut. 9 rank and file wounded—50th Foot, 2 rank and file killed; 1 rank and file wounded.—91st Foot, none killed or wounded. 6th, or Light, Brig.-Gen. Fane.—2 Battalion, 59th foot, 1 serjeant, 6 rank and file killed ; 3 serjeants, 25 rank and file wounded ; 7 rank and file missing.—5th Battalion, 60th Foot, 8 ra;k file killed ; 2 lieutenants, 1 staff, 5 scrjeants, 34 rank and file wounded ; 16 rank and sile missing. Cavalry.—20th Light Dragoons, 1 horse killed; 3 rank and file, 2 horses wounded. —Total, 1 lieut. col., 2 captains, 1 ensign • 3 serjeants, U3 rank and file, 1 horse killed; 1 lieut col., 3 majors, 6 captains, 8 lieut. I ensign, I staff, 20 serjeants, 205 rank and file, 2 horses wounded; 1 captain, 3 lieuteinants, 1 serjeant, I drummer, CS rank and file missing. * Names of . Officers killed, wounded, and

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cf the French army will be assembled beto en Torres Vedras and the capital, in he course of a few days. I have the onour to be, &c. — (Signed) ARTHUR WELLEs LEY. Head-quarters, Maceira, Aug. 21, 180°. My Lord –The report which I have the * nour to inclose to your lordship, made at oy request by lieut. gen. Sir A. Wellesley, onveys information which can:hot but prove shy gratifying to his majesty.--On my iding, this morning, I found that the emy's attack had alrealy commenced, d I was fortunate enough to reach the d of action in time to witness and apove of every disposition that had been, n! was afterwards made by sir A. Wellesy; his comprehensive mind furnishing a eady resource in every emergency, and otering it quite unnecessary to direct any eration.—I am happy, on this occasion, bear testimony to the great spirit and 3d conduct displayed by all the troops mposing this gallant army in this well otested action —I send this dispatch by 9t. Campbell, aid-de-camp to sir A. ellesley, no person being better qualified give your lordships information.—I have honour to be, &c. (Signed) Is Ai: RY 13 RAR D, Lieut. General.—To the Rt. on. Lord Castlereagh, &c. Piniera, August 21, 1808.-Sir, I have honour to report to you, that the enemy &ed us in our position at Vimiera this 'Ling.—The village of Vimiera stands a valley,' through which runs the river ceira ; at the back, hind to the westward 4 northward of this village is a mountain, e western point of which touches the sca, d the eastern is separated by a deep ravine om the heights, over which passes the 2d which leads from Lourinha, and the rthward, to Vimiera. The greater part the infantry, the 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th d 8th bragades, where posted on this cuntain, with eight pieces of artillery, aj. gen. Hill's brigade being on the right, 3.gen."Ferguson's on the left, having one ttalion on the heights, separated from the Juntain. On the eastern and southern of the town is a hill which is cntirely *mmanded, particularly on its right, by the fountain to the westward of the town, and ommanding all the ground in the neightourhood to the southward and eastward, on which brig. gem. Fane was posted with his riflemen and the 50th regiment, and big gen. Anstruther with his brigade, with half a brigade of six-pounders and half a brigade of nine-pounders, which had been

ordered to the position in the course of last night. The ground over which passes the road from Lourinha commanded the left of this height, and it had not been occu

pied, excepting by a piquet, a s the camp

had been taken up only for one night; and there was no water in the neighbourhood of this height.—The cavalry and the reserve of artillery were in the valley between the hills on which the infantry. stood : both flanking and supporting brig. gen. Fane's advanced guard.—The enemy first appeared at eight o'clock in the morning, in large bodies of cavalry on our left upon the heights on the road to Lourinha; and it was soon obvious that the attack would be made upon our advanced guard, and the left of our position ; and moj, gen. Fergoson's brigade was immediately moved across the ravite to the heights, on the road to Lourinha, with three pieces of cannon; he was followed successively by brig. gen.

Nightingale with his brigade and three pieces.

of cannon; brig. gen. Ackland with his brigade, and brig gen. Bowes with his brigade. These troops were formed (maj. gen. Ferguson's brigade in the first line ; orig. gen. Nightingale's in the second : and brig. gen. Bowe's and Ackland's, in columns in the rear) on those heights, with their right upon the valley which leads into Vimiera; and their left upon the other ravine, which separates these heights from the range which terminates at the landing-place at Maceira. On these last-mentioned heights, the Portuguese troops, which had been in the bottom near Vimiera, were posted in the first instance, and they were supported by brig. gen. Craufurd's brigade.—The troops of the advanced guard on the heights to the southward and eastward of the town were deemed sufficient for its defence, and maj. gen. Hill was moved to the centre of the mountain on which a great body of the infantry had been posted, as a support to these troops, and as a reserve to the whole army. In addition to this support these troops had that of the cavalry in the rear of their right.—The enemy's attack began in several colomns on the whole of the troops on this height ; on the left they advanced, notwithstanding the fire of the rifle-men, close to the 50th, and were checked and driven back only by the bayonets of that corps. The 2d battalion, 43d regiment, was likewise closely engaged with then in the road which leads into Vimiera; and part of that corps having been ordered into the church-yard to prevent them from peretrating into the town. On the right of the

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French troops.

position they were repulsed by the bayonets of the 97th regiment, which corps was suc; cessfully suported by the 2d battalion 52d regiment, which, by an advance in column, took the enemy in flank —Besides' this opposition given to the attack of the enemy on our advanced guard by their own exertions, they were attacked in flank by brig. gen. Ackland's brigade in its advance to its position on the heights on the left, and a canmonade was kept up on the flank of the enemy's columns, by the artillery on those heights—At length, after a most desperate contest, the enemy was driven back in con

fusion from this attack with the loss of seven

pieces of cannon, many prisoners, and a great number of officers and soldiers killed and wounded. He was pursued by the detachment of the 20th light dragoons, but the enemy's cavalry were so much superior in numbers, that this detachment has suffered much, and lieut. col. Taylor was unfortunately killed.--Nearly at the same time the

enemy's attack commenced upon the heights

on the road to Lourinha. This attack was supported by a large body of cavalry, and was made with the usual inpetuosity of the It was received with steadiness by maj. gen. Ferguson's brigade, consisting of the 30th, 40th, and 71st regiments; and these corps charged, as soon as the enemy approached them, who gave way, and they continued to advance upon him, supported by the 82d, one of the corps of brig. gen. Nightingale's brigade, which, as the ground extended, afterwards formed a part of the first line; by the 29th regiment, and by brig. gen. Bowe's and Ackland's brigades, while brig. gen. Craufurd's brigade, and the Portuguese troops, in two lines, advanced along the height on the left. —In the advance of maj. gen. Ferguson's

brigade, six pieces of cannon were taken

from the enemy, with many prisoners, and vast numbers were killed and wounded.— The enemy afterwards made an attempt to recover a part of his artillery, by attacking the 71st and 82d regiments, which were halted in a valley in which it had been taken. These regiments retired from the low grounds in the valley to the heights, were they halted, faced about, fired, and advanced upon the enemy, who had, by that time, arrived in the low ground, and they thus obliged him again to retire with great loss.—In this action, in which the whole of the French

force in Portugal was employed under the

cominand of the Duke D'Abrantes (General

Junot) in person, in which the enemy w certainly superior in cavalry and artille, and in which not more than half of t British army was actnally engaged, he sustained a signal defeat, and has lost

pieces of cannon, so 23 anmunition wa gons, with powd r, shells, stores of all & scriptions, and twenty thousand round, musket ammun' ion. One generas oth. (Beniere) has been wounded and taken p soner, at:d a great many officers and sold. have been killed, wounded, and taken. The valour and discipline of his masco troops have been conspicuous upon to casion, as you, who witnessed the gro. part of the action, must have observed, i.

it is a justice to the following corps

draw your notice to then in a partoo manner, viz.—the royal artillery, command by lieut. col. Robe; the 20th dragoo which had been commanded by lieut. c. Taylor ; the 50th regiment, comma;ide. Col. Walker ; the 2d battallion 95th to commanded by maj Travers; the 5th to talion, 60th regiment, commanded by m. Davy ; the second battallion 43d, co, manded by maj. Hull; the 2d battalion 54 coinmanded by lieut. col. Ross; the g; regiment, commanded by lieut. col. Lyu the 36th regiment, commanded by a Burne; the 40th, commanded by cos Ka mis; the 71st, commanded by lieut. * Pack; and the 82d regiment, commanded maj. Eyre.—In mentioning col. Burne, a the 36th regiment to you upon this occasi. I cannot avoid to add, that the regulars orderly conduct of this corps, through this service, and their gallantry and discipli in action have been conspicuous.—f m take this opportunity of acknowledging obligations to the general and staff officers the army. , I was much indebted to maj.g. Spencer's judgement and experience, ini decision which I formed, with respect tot number of troops allotted to each point of: fence; and for his advice and assistan throughout the action.—In the position to up by maj. gen. Ferguson's brigade, and in advance upon the enemy, that officer ed equal bravery and judgment; and praise is due to brig. gen. Fane, and b gen. Anstruther, for their gallant des of their position in front oft Vimiera, a to brig. gen. Nightingale, for the man in which he supported the attack ... enemy, made by major-gen. Ferguson. (To be continued.)

Printed by Cox and Baylis, Great Queen Street; published by R. Bagshaw, Brydges Street, Cove Garden, where former Numbers may be had : sold also by J. Budd, Crown and Mitre, Pall-Mail o - - - - - - - - *

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