Tulipmania: Money, Honor, and Knowledge in the Dutch Golden Age

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University of Chicago Press, 15 sep. 2008 - 446 páginas
In the 1630s the Netherlands was gripped by tulipmania: a speculative fever unprecedented in scale and, as popular history would have it, folly. We all know the outline of the story—how otherwise sensible merchants, nobles, and artisans spent all they had (and much that they didn’t) on tulip bulbs. We have heard how these bulbs changed hands hundreds of times in a single day, and how some bulbs, sold and resold for thousands of guilders, never even existed. Tulipmania is seen as an example of the gullibility of crowds and the dangers of financial speculation.
But it wasn’t like that. As Anne Goldgar reveals in Tulipmania, not one of these stories is true. Making use of extensive archival research, she lays waste to the legends, revealing that while the 1630s did see a speculative bubble in tulip prices, neither the height of the bubble nor its bursting were anywhere near as dramatic as we tend to think. By clearing away the accumulated myths, Goldgar is able to show us instead the far more interesting reality: the ways in which tulipmania reflected deep anxieties about the transformation of Dutch society in the Golden Age.

“Goldgar tells us at the start of her excellent debunking book: ‘Most of what we have heard of [tulipmania] is not true.’. . . She tells a new story.”—Simon Kuper, Financial Times
 

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An examination of the Dutch economy of the Reformation through tracing the currency of tulips. Leer reseña completa

Índice

Introduction
1
Something Strange
20
Art Flowers
62
Bloemisten
131
Grieving Money
194
Bad Faith
253
Cabbage Fever
305
Glossary
321
A Note on Money
323
Abbreviations
325
Notes
327
Index
399
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Sobre el autor (2008)

Anne Goldgar is reader in early modern history at King’s College, London. She is the author of Impolite Learning: Conduct and Community in the Republic of Letters, 1680–1750.

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