The complete poems of Anna Akhmatova

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Initially published in 1990, when the New York Times Book Review named it one of fourteen "Best Books of the Year," Judith Hemschemeyer's translation of The Complete Poems of Anna Akhmatova is the definitive edition, and has sold over 13,000 copies, making it one of the most successful poetry titles of recent years.This reissued and revised printing features a new biographical essay as well as expanded notes to the poems, both by Roberta Reeder, project editor and author of Anna Akhmatova: Poet and Prophet (St. Martin's Press, 1994). Encyclopedic in scope, with more than 800 poems, 100 photographs, a historical chronology, index of first lines, and bibliography. The Complete Poems will be the definitive English language collection of Akhmatova for many years to come.

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LibraryThing Review

Reseña de usuario  - HadriantheBlind - LibraryThing

I haven't read the complete collection, just an edited anthology with Kunitz translating. A slow and languorous howl of a collection - Russian poetry at some of its finest. Intense emotions in sparse words. Leer reseña completa

LibraryThing Review

Reseña de usuario  - josephquinton - LibraryThing

A monumestal work. Complete means complete. Hemschemeyer learned Russian for the task and for a non-russian speaker she did a marvelous job. Of the poetry there is no need to speak - from the intimate ... Leer reseña completa

Índice

List of Illustrations
xxxix
Translators Preface Judith Hemschemeyer
1
The Life and Poetic Works
17
A Memoir Isaiah Berlin
35
Chronology
57
New Poems and Revisions
63
TSARSKOYE SELO
67
Original title page Evening
78
SECRETS OF THE CRAFT 1 Creation
413
The Muse
414
The Reader
415
Latest Poem
416
Epigram
417
Concerning Poetry
418
Probably much still remains
419
Pushkin
421

EVENING
79
The hearts memory of the sun grows faint
85
When youre drunk its so much fun
93
I came here an idler
96
Masquerade in the Park
102
Imitation of I E Annensky
108
First Return
116
PETERSBURG
119
CONFUSION
133
Fragment
139
The high vaults of the Polish church
145
I see the faded flag above the customhouse
151
You gave me a difficult youth
152
IV
158
I visited the poet
164
Original title page White Flock
170
we are beggars we have nothing
173
JULY 1914
176
Instead of wisdom
177
The Reply
183
The Lord is not merciful to reapers and gardeners
189
Drowsiness takes me back again
195
We dont know how to say goodbye
201
To My Sister
207
The White House
213
The twentyfirst Night Monday
219
The first ray oflight Gods blessing
223
Not mystery and not grief
229
PLANTAIN
235
I asked the cuckoo
241
And here left alone
247
Now farewell capital
249
ANNO DOMINI MCMXXI
256
He said that I have no rivals
262
The angel who for three years watched over me
268
BIBLICAL VERSES
272
The fantastic autumn constructed a high cupola
279
Let the voice of the organ again burst forth
285
THE VOICE OF MEMORY
291
Lullaby
296
PHOTO BIOGRAPHY
301
Valeriya Sreznevskaya Tsarskoye Selo 1909
310
Innokenty Annensky
314
Inside the Stray Dog
320
Boris Anrep and his family Painting by Henry Lamb
326
Nevsky Prospekt at Anichkov Bridge 1920s
332
Nadezhda Mandelstam
339
Marina Tsvetaeva
347
Tashkent 1940
351
Lev Gumilyov after release in 1956
357
At the conferral of the Honorary Doctorate
363
Inscription on a Book
373
The Poet
379
Dante
395
When someone dies
401
Mayakovsky in 1913
402
Inscription on the Book Plantain
403
Leningrad in March 1941
404
Teacher
422
To the Londoners
423
Shade
424
But I am giving you notice
425
THE WIND OF WAR l Vow
426
First LongRange Firing on Leningrad
427
Courage
428
Trenches have been dug in the garden
429
Nox
430
And you my friends from the latest callup
431
Something glorious is beginning gloriously
432
THE MOON AT ZENITH
434
Those lynx eyes of yours Asia
440
Three Autumns
448
SWEETBRIER IN BLOSSOM
456
Let whoever wants to relax in the south
462
MOSCOW TREFOIL
467
ODD NUMBER
475
March Elegy
483
A SMALL PAGE FROM ANTIQUITY
487
Native Land
493
The Boyarina Morozova Detail of painting
497
From a Primeval Poem
501
In Smolensk Cemetery
507
Lyrical Digression on the Seventh Elegy
519
Tfie Way of AH the Earth
530
From PROLOGUE
535
POEM WITHOUT A HERO
541
Additions Stanzas not included in the text
582
I plucked lilies lovely and fragrant
615
For you Aphrodite Ill compose a dance
621
On the little table tea rich pastries
622
Like someone who has left by the western gate
636
Flowers cold from the dew
642
If the moon does not wander through the sky
648
I am bitter and old
657
To the Caucasus
663
you poison the water
664
And here in defiance of the fact
670
To live as if in freedom
677
Postscript to The Leningrad Cycle
683
Palmyra
686
4 51956
695
I dont have special claims
701
They will forget? How astonishing
711
At least today give me a call
713
Somebodys voice can be heard by the porch
726
Listening to Singing
731
Grand Confession
744
Let the Australian sit down invisible
756
Theres no way for me to take flight
762
By turning endings into beginnings
766
Notes to Mirrors and Masks
871
Plaque outside Fountain House site
875
Index to Poems By Source
887
Select Bibliography
945
Página de créditos

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Sobre el autor (1992)

Anna Akhmatova, 1889 - 1966 Poet Anna Akhmatova was born in 1889 in Bolshoy Fontan near Odessa, Ukraine and was the daughter of a naval engineer. She attended a girls' gymnasium in Tsarskoe Selo, Smolnyi Institute in St. Petersburg, Fundukleevskaia gymnasium (1906), law school (1907), and then moved to St. Petersburg to study literature. When she was 21, she became a member of the Acmeist group of poets, led by Nikolai Gumilev, who she married in 1910 and had one son with, Lev Gumilev. They were divorced in 1918 and that same year she married Vladimir Shileiko. This marriage also failed and she was later married to Nikolai Punin until his death in 1958. Her first husband was executed in 1921 for antirevolutionary activities; afterwards, she entered a period of almost complete poetic silence that lasted until 1940. Akhmatova's first collection of poetry was "Vecher" ("Evening"), which appeared in 1912. Two years later, she gained fame with "Chyotki" ("Rosary" 1914). Her next collections were "Belaya Staya" ("The White Flock" 1917), "Podorozhnik" ("Plantain" 1921) and "Anno Domini MCMXXI (1922). For a brief time during World War II in 1940, several of her poems were published in the literary monthly Zvezda. In 1942, her poem "Courage" appeared on a front page of Pravda. In 1941, following the German invasion, Akhmatova delivered an inspiring radio address to the women of Leningrad. She was evacuated to Tashkent where she read her poems to hospitalized soldiers. In an effort to gain freedom for her son who had been exiled to Siberia, Akhmatova's poems eulogizing Stalin appeared in several issues of the weekly magazine Ogonyok. "Poema Bez Geroya" (Poem Without a Hero, 1963) was begun in Leningrad in 1940 and was revised for over 20 years. It is divided into three parts and has no consistent plot or conventional hero. This poem wasn't published in the Soviet Union until 1976. "Rekviem" (Requiem, 1963) is a poem-cycle that was a literary monument to the victims of Stalin's Terror. The earliest poems were dated 1935 and the remainders were written from 1938-40. Requiem is ten short, numbered poems that deal with her personal experiences following the arrests of her husband, friends and son. The last poem reflects the grief of others who suffered loss during that time of terror. Akhmatova was awarded the Etna-Taormina Price, an international poetry prize awarded in Italy in 1964, and received an honorary doctoral degree from Oxford University in 1965. Anna Akhmatova died in 1966.

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