Riddled with Life: Friendly Worms, Ladybug Sex, and the Parasites that Make Us who We are

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Harcourt, 2007 - 328 páginas
We think of disease as our enemy, something we try to eradicate; germs and infections are things we battle. But in this witty, engaging book, evolutionary biologist Marlene Zuk reveals that, in fact, disease is our partner, not our foe, and is responsible for everything from how we look to how we have sex.

Since the earliest days of life on earth, disease has evolved alongside us. Drawing on the latest research and studies, Zuk explains the role of disease in answering a fascinating range of questions such as: Why do men die younger than women? Why does the average male bird not have a penis? Why do we--and lots of other animals--get STDs? How is our obsession with cleanliness making us sicker? And how can parasites sometimes make us well?

Using her own work on sexual selection as well as a sampling of stories from the natural world, Zuk makes us reconsider the fearsome parasite.

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LibraryThing Review

Reseña de usuario  - MarthaJeanne - LibraryThing

This was fairly interesting, but it got to be a bit much by the end. I read this in German, and I suspect that the style problems that caused me to mark it down somewhat are due to the translation ... Leer reseña completa

LibraryThing Review

Reseña de usuario  - satyridae - LibraryThing

There's a huge ick factor in this book, which deals in worms and other parasites of humanity, as well as the evolution of immune systems and infectious agents. The science is fascinating, and the ... Leer reseña completa

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Sobre el autor (2007)

MARLENE ZUK is a professor of biology at the University of California, Riverside, where she studies behavior in a variety of animals. She has written articles for numerous publications including the Los Angeles Times and the New York Times .

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