Project-Based Learning: Differentiating Instruction for the 21st Century

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Corwin Press, 24 feb. 2012 - 216 páginas

Increase achievement and engagement for all students in 21st century classrooms!

Project-based learning has emerged as one of today’s most effective instructional practices. In PBL, students confront real-world issues and problems, collaborate to create solutions, and present their results. This exciting new book describes how PBL fosters 21st century skills and innovative thinking. The author provides instructional strategies, assessment methods, and detailed instruction on how to:

  • Design projects for various content areas across all grade levels
  • Integrate technology throughout the learning process
  • Use Khan Academy, webquests, wikis, and more to foster deeper conceptual learning
  • Build social learning networks
  • Differentiate instruction by scaffolding supports for the learning process
 

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Índice

INTRODUCTION
1
About This Book
2
Who Should Read This Book
3
Conclusion
5
ENGAGING STUDENTS THROUGH PROJECTBASED LEARNING
7
A Sample PBL Project
11
Components of PBL Assignments
20
Rationale for a PBL Instructional Approach
21
Accessing Simulations for Your Classroom
90
The Learning Company
92
Games and Simulations in PBL
94
Webquests Within PBL Projects
95
Building a Webquest
99
Classroom Blogs in PBL Projects
105
Using Wikis for PBL Projects
107
Examples of Wikis in the Classroom
108

ProjectBased Learning and Differentiated Instruction
23
PROJECTBASED LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM MAKING PBL WORK IN THE CLASSROOM
29
How Does PBL Fit Into the Curriculum?
32
Research on the Efficacy of PBL
33
The Role of Instructional Technology in PBL
36
Challenges for Teachers in ProjectBased Learning
38
Schoolwide PBL Instructional Approaches
41
EdVisions Schools
42
Expeditionary Learning Schools
43
DESIGNING PROJECTBASED LEARNING PROJECTS
45
A Driving Question
46
Student Choice and Student Voice
47
Specific Processes for Investigation and Research
49
Student Inquiry and Innovation
51
Collaboration and Teamwork
52
Opportunities for Reflection
53
Feedback and Revision
54
Public Presentation of the Project Results
57
Preplanning Questions for Designing a PBL Experience
58
What Technology Resources Are Available?
61
How Long Will Preparation of Instructional Resources Take?
62
What Other Resources Are Available for the Planned Project?
63
What Is a Realistic Planning Time Frame for PBL?
64
Initiation and Team Planning
66
Gathering Information
68
Creation Development and Initial Evaluation of Presentation and Prototype Artifacts
69
The Second Research Phase
70
Final Presentation Development
71
Summary of Six Instructional Phases
72
A Schedule for a PBL Project
73
Conclusions
76
INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY IN PROJECTBASED LEARNING CLASSROOMS
77
Teaching in the 21stCentury Digital World
78
Todays Digital World
79
What Does This Mean for Teachers Implementing PBL?
80
Instructional Technology for PBL
81
Presentation Software
83
Interactive Whiteboards for PBL Presentations
84
Simulations and Games for PBL
85
ARGs in the Classroom
88
Khan Academy
113
Twitter and Ning in the Classroom
114
Moodle
116
YouTube
117
Student Security Media Security and Media Literacy
118
A Sample TechnologyBased PBL Project
120
INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES IN PROJECTBASED LEARNING
127
StudentDirected Inquiry Skills in PBL
130
Time Line Planning
133
Sample Class Time Line for the Civil War Memorial Garden Project
135
Student Creativity Within PBL Projects
139
Podcast Development
140
Other Creative Assignment Options for Students Within PBL
142
TeacherDirected Strategies in PBL
143
Individual Work Within PBL
144
Cooperative Learning Strategies Within PBL
146
Teaching Cooperative Learning Skills
147
A Jigsaw Within a PBL Project
148
Advantages of Cooperative Learning
152
Preplanned Activities or Teaching on the Fly?
154
Conclusions
156
ASSESSMENT OPTIONS FOR PROJECTBASED LEARNING
157
Content Coverage Versus Learning in a StandardsBased Era
159
Rubrics Within PBL Projects
161
Various Types of Rubrics
162
Developing Rubrics
163
Reflective SelfEvaluation in PBL
167
Numeric SelfEvaluations in PBL
168
OpenEnded SelfEvaluations in PBL
170
Reflective Peer Evaluations
172
Portfolio Assessment
176
Grading PBL Work
177
A Plethora of Grading Options
178
Generating Semester or Project Grades
179
Conclusions
181
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PBL AND STATE CURRICULAR STANDARDS
183
REFERENCES
187
INDEX
193
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Sobre el autor (2012)

Learn more about William Bender's PD offerings

Consulting Description: Differentiated Instruction
Consulting Description: Math
Consulting Description: Project-Based Learning
Consulting Description: RTI
Consulting Description: Technology


William N. Bender began his career by teaching eighth- and ninth-grade students in the public schools. He worked in higher education for 28 years and published over 60 research articles and 24 books in education. He specializes in instructional strategies for all students and is recognized as a national leader on instructional tactics, response to intervention, and differentiated instruction. Dr. Bender believes his job is to inform audiences across the nation of innovative, up to date information, based on current applied research. Dr. Bender received his Ph.D. in Special Education from the University of North Carolina and currently consults with schools and districts in the United States and Canada.

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