Pedro Páramo

Portada
University of Texas Press, 1 nov. 2002 - 161 páginas
2 Reseñas
Deserted villages of rural Mexico, where images and memories of the past linger like unquiet ghosts, haunted the imaginations of two artists—writer Juan Rulfo and photographer Josephine Sacabo. In one such village of the mind, Comala, Rulfo set his classic novel Pedro Páramo, a dream-like tale that intertwines a man’s quest to find his lost father and reclaim his patrimony with the father’s obsessive love for a woman who will not be possessed—Susana San Juan. Recognizing that "Rulfo was describing a world I already knew" and feeling "a very personal response, particularly to Susana San Juan and her dilemma," Josephine Sacabo used Rulfo’s novel as the starting point for a series of evocative photographs she calls "The Unreachable World of Susana San Juan: Homage to Juan Rulfo." This volume brings together Rulfo’s novel and Sacabo’s photographs to offer a dual artistic vision of the same unforgettable story. Margaret Sayers Peden’s superb translation renders the novel as poetic and mysterious in English as it is in Spanish. Josephine Sacabo’s photographs tell, in her words, "the story of a woman forced to take refuge in madness as a means of protecting her inner world from the ravages of the forces around her: a cruel and tyrannical patriarchy, a church that offers no redemption, the senseless violence of revolution, death itself."
 

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Sobre el autor (2002)

JUAN RULFO (1918-1986) was one of Mexico's premier authors of the twentieth century and an important precursor of "magical realism" in Latin American writing.

Reared in Laredo, Texas, in the Mexican ranchero culture about which Juan Rulfo writes, JOSEPHINE SACABO is a photographer who now lives and works in New Orleans.

Margaret Sayers Peden received a bachelor's degree in 1948, a master's degree in 1963, and doctorate degree in 1966 from the University of Missouri. She was a professor of Spanish at the University of Missouri until her retirement in 1989. She is a translator. Emilio Carballido's The Norther (El Norte) became her first published translation in 1970. She has translated 65 books including works by Pablo Neruda, Isabel Allende, Claribel Alegría, Carlos Fuentes, Octavio Paz, and Cesar Vallejo. She has received several awards including the 2010 Lewis Galantiere Translation Prize for her translation of Fernando de Rojas' La Celestina and the 2012 Ralph Manheim Medal for Translation, which is awarded in recognition of a lifetime achievement in the field of literary translation.