My Ears Are Bent

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Vintage Books, 2008 - 299 páginas

Famed New Yorker writer Joseph Mitchell, as a young newspaper reporter in 1930s New York, interviewed fan dancers, street evangelists, voodoo conjurers, not to mention a lady boxer who also happened to be a countess. Mitchell haunted parts of the city now vanished: the fish market, burlesque houses, tenement neighborhoods, and storefront churches. Whether he wrote about a singing first baseman for the Brooklyn Dodgers or a nudist who does a reverse striptease, Mitchell brilliantly illuminated the humanity in the oddest New Yorkers.

These pieces, written primarily for The World-Telegram and The Herald Tribune, highlight his abundant gifts of empathy and observation, and give us the full-bodied picture of the famed New Yorker writer Mitchell would become.

 

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LibraryThing Review

Reseña de usuario  - AliceaP - LibraryThing

Remember when I read The 40s which was a collection of articles from The New Yorker? Remember how I talked about how this book came into my life because I read an article on the NYPL website that ... Leer reseña completa

LibraryThing Review

Reseña de usuario  - BellaFoxx - LibraryThing

Mitchell’s writing is straightforward and honest, but not plain or boring. This is a fascinating selection of articles. Besides interviews he gives us a look at the inside of the newspaper business in ... Leer reseña completa

Páginas seleccionadas

Índice

My Ears Are Bent
3
Drunks
25
The Year of Our Lord 1936 or Hit
37
CheeseCake
45
Some Virgins No Professionals
53
Nude Definitely Nude
59
It Is Almost Sacred
73
The Influence of Mr L Sittenberg on
79
Come to Jesus
86
Sports Section I
104
Harlem Is Packed for the Fight
127
Its a Living 2 I 2
212
Villain
224
Peter Arno
252
Showmanship
275
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Sobre el autor (2008)

Joseph Mitchell was born near Iona, North Carolina, in 1908, and came to New York City in 1929, when he was twenty-one years old. He eventually found a job as an apprentice crime reporter for The World. He also worked as a reporter and features writer at The Herald Tribune and The World-Telegram before landing at The New Yorker in 1938, where he remained until his death in 1996.

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