Mi familia y otros animales

Portada
Alianza, 1997 - 374 páginas
4 Reseñas
El original estilo narrativo de Gerald Durrell, combinación de varios géneros, como el retrato de gentes y lugares, la autobiografía y el relato humorístico, explica el gran éxito obtenido desde el día de su publicación por MI FAMILIA Y OTROS ANIMALES. Primera parte de su divertida trilogía de Corfú, proseguida con «Bichos y demás parientes» (BA 0502) y «El jardín de los dioses» (BA 0503), presenta una ágil y graciosa galería de personajes: Larry ¿el futuro autor del «Cuarteto de Alejandría»¿ y sus estrafalarias amistades, mamá Durrell y su inagotable sentido común, Spiro ¿el corfuano angloparlante¿ y toda una serie de animales retratados como sólo puede hacerlo quien a lo largo de toda una vida los ha tratado con inteligencia y ternura.

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Sobre el autor (1997)

Gerald Durrell was born on January 7, 1925 in Jamshedpur, India to British parents. After the death of his father in 1928, the family lived in England and Europe before settling in Corfu, where he spent much of his childhood. Educated by private tutors, he became interested in natural history and amassed a private collection of dozens of creatures from scorpions to owls. He went on numerous wildlife expeditions and founded the Jersey Zoological Park and the Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust with the purpose of breeding endangered species. His first book, The Overloaded Ark, was published in 1953. He wrote 37 books during his lifetime including My Family and Other Animals, The Bafut Beagles, A Zoo in My Luggage, Rosy Is My Relative, and The Mockery Bird. He received the Order of the British Empire in 1982 and was featured in the United Nations' Roll of Honor for Environmental Achievement in 1988. He died from complications related to a liver transplant on January 30, 1995 at the age of 70.

A prolific and protean writer since the early 1930s, Durrell led a life as rich and varied as his writings. Born of Anglo-Irish parents in Himalayan India, Durrell attended school in England but spent most of his life abroad. Along with numerous odd jobs, he taught at the English Institute in Athens and at the Greek gymnasium on Cyprus; edited a witty and avant-garde magazine in Paris; founded and edited several poetry magazines; worked as press attache in Egypt and Yugoslavia; and lectured for the British Council in Argentina. The popular success of The Alexandria Quartet (1957-60) enabled him to live solely by writing. Durrell's first important work, The Black Book (1938), was greeted by T.S. Eliot as "the first piece of work by a new English writer to give me any hope for the future of prose fiction." In it, Durrell has said, "I first heard the sound of my own voice. . . . This is an experience no artist ever forgets." Appropriately, The Black Book was unavailable until 1962 in the English-speaking world that it attacked as smug, decadent, and cold. Durrell's fiction includes two apprentice novels, Pied Piper of Lovers (1935) and Panic Spring (1937); a psychological mystery set on Crete, The Dark Labyrinth (1947); The Revolt of Aphrodite (1974); and The Avignon Quintet (1974-85). Aphrodite, a not wholly successful satire of science fiction, Gothic romance, and business expose novels, concerns a young inventor's misadventures with modern technology and love. He is constrained to create an exact "living" replica of a beautiful, deceased Greek actress, but the machine, the perfect illusion, commits suicide rather than inhabit the world's harsh reality. The subject of much controversy, The Alexandria Quartet, is Durrell's major achievement. The Avignon Quintet shares the Quartet's aesthetic and thematic concerns. One of its narrators tells us that a quincunx is a form bearing mystical meaning derived from the pattern of trees in "an ancient Greek temple grove"---one at each corner of a square and one at the center. The mysticism expresses ancient Gnostic beliefs and relates to the Knights Templar (about whom one of the characters is writing a history), who were destroyed in the early fourteenth century but supposedly left a vast treasure buried at the quincunx's center. All of the characters, who are less vividly conceived than their Quartet counterparts, seek some metaphysical treasure or another. Durrell's other writings include three verse plays with ancient settings, a dozen books of poetry, including his Collected Poems (1956), five island books (the best of which, Bitter Lemons, 1959, won the Duff Cooper Prize), and several collections of "Sketches from Diplomatic Life.

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