Ethnic Groups in Conflict, Updated Edition With a New Preface

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University of California Press, 9 abr. 2001 - 720 páginas
Drawing material from dozens of divided societies, Donald L. Horowitz constructs his theory of ethnic conflict, relating ethnic affiliations to kinship and intergroup relations to the fear of domination. A groundbreaking work when it was published in 1985, the book remains an original and powerfully argued comparative analysis of one of the most important forces in the contemporary world.
 

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Índice

IV
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V
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VIII
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IX
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X
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XI
329
XIV
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XV
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XVI
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XVII
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XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
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XII
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Página 24 - In their consequences they differ precisely in this way: ethnic coexistences condition a mutual repulsion and disdain but allow each ethnic community to consider its own honor as the highest one; the caste structure brings about a social subordination and an acknowledgment of 'more honor' in favor of the privileged caste and status groups. This is due to the fact that in the caste structure ethnic distinctions as such have become 'functional...
Página 23 - status' segregation grown into a 'caste' differs in its structure from a mere 'ethnic' segregation: the caste structure transforms the horizontal and unconnected coexistences of ethnically segregated groups into a vertical social system of super- and subordination. Correctly formulated: a comprehensive societalization integrates the ethnically divided communities into specific political and communal action.
Página 32 - The Development and Persistence of Ethnic Voting," in Lawrence H. Fuchs, ed., American Ethnic Politics (New York: Harper & Row, 1968...

Sobre el autor (2001)

Donald L. Horowitz is the James B. Duke professor of Law and Political Science at Duke University. He is also the author of A Democratic South Africa? Constitutional Engineering in a Divided Society (California, 1991), which won the Ralph Bunche Prize of the American Political Science Association, and coeditor of Immigrants in Two Democracies: French and American Experience (1992).

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