Crises in Continental Philosophy: Anthropological Perspectives on the American Jewish Experience

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Arleen B. Dallery, Charles E. Scott, P. Holley Roberts
SUNY Press, 1 ene 1990 - 283 páginas
This book punctuates the moments of crisis in continental thought from the foundational crisis of reason in Husserl's call for a rigorous science of phenomenology to the current crisis of postmodernism and its rejection of Husserl's metanarrative of history and rationality. The mediating links between these moments is the centrality of the epochal history of Being, the power of cultural and disciplinary practices, and the dispersal of meaning in the post-Husserlian and post-subjective philosophies of Heidegger, Foucault, Derrida, and others.

Included here are the thoughts of leading scholars who critically discuss Husserl's analysis of the crisis of Western thought and the importance of the concepts of "world" in Husserl's early writings. The authors analyze the deprivileging of philosophy as social critique through the text of Husserl, Habermas, Foucault, and recent feminist theory. They examine the end of the epistemological and morally autonomous subject in continental thought. Together, these thoughts articulate multiple points or moments of crisis without cure or end.
 

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Sobre el autor (1990)

Arleen B. Dallery is Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy at LaSalle University.

Charles E. Scott is Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University.

P. Holley Roberts is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Philosophy at Vanderbilt University.

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