Conversations with the Capeman: The Untold Story of Salvador Agron

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Univ of Wisconsin Press, 2000 - 514 páginas
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In the neighborhood of Hell’s Kitchen, 1959, a playground confrontation leaves two white youths bludgeoned to death by a gang of Puerto Rican kids. Sixteen-year-old Salvador Agron, who wore a red-lined satin cape, was charged with the murders, though no traces of blood were found on his dagger. At seventeen, Agron was the youngest person ever to be sentenced to death in the electric chair. After nearly two years in the Death House at Sing Sing Prison, a group of prominent citizens, including Eleanor Roosevelt and the governor of Puerto Rico, convinced Governor Rockefeller to commute Agron’s sentence to one of life imprisonment.
In 1973 Richard Jacoby began a voluminous, twelve-year correspondence with Agron. His Conversations with the Capeman is guaranteed to challenge deeply held notions of crime, punishment, and redemption. Salvador Agron was released from prison in 1979 and died in the Bronx in 1986 at the age of forty-two.

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Índice

Sección 1
3
Sección 2
4
Sección 3
5
Sección 4
6
Sección 5
7
Sección 6
27
Sección 7
67
Sección 8
129
Sección 13
257
Sección 14
301
Sección 15
330
Sección 16
360
Sección 17
367
Sección 18
413
Sección 19
461
Sección 20
483

Sección 9
169
Sección 10
181
Sección 11
197
Sección 12
205
Sección 21
497
Sección 22
509
Sección 23
511
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Sobre el autor (2000)

Richard Jacoby, who grew up in the Bronx and Brooklyn, now lives in Santa Monica, California, where he has worked for over twenty years as a special education teacher for profoundly disabled children.

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