Changing Ways of Death in Twentieth-century Australia: War, Medicine, and the Funeral Business

Portada
UNSW Press, 2006 - 409 páginas
Death and bereavement come to us all. This is the first book to help us explain and understand their history across twentieth-century Australia. It draws aside the veil of silence that surrounded death for fifty years after 1918—characterized by denial, minimal ritual and private sorrow—and explores the dramatic changes since the 1980s. Emotional and compelling, award-winning writer Pat Jalland's important book looks at the World Wars and the impact of medicine, with many stories drawn from letters and diaries. She also discusses cancer, euthanasia, palliative care, the funeral business, cemeteries and cremation.
 

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Índice

Introduction The world we have lost
1
Death denial and silent grief
15
The two world wars and denial of death
37
The Great War Heroic deaths and distant graves
39
The silent heartache of the Great War
73
Private and secular grief Katharine susannah Prichard
104
Airmen missing presumed dead Without emotion without witness without farewell
125
The horrible nightmare of prisoners of war in the AsiaPacific
150
Euthanasia and the doctors
233
Palliative care and the hospice movement
256
The funeral business cemeteries and cremation
277
The funeral business in Australia A racket in human sorrow?
279
Overcrowded burial grounds modern lawn cemeteries and mausolea
302
Cremation in Australia since 1914
326
The second cultural shift
347
The revival of expressive grief
349

The Second World War and the suppression of sorrow
169
Medicine and dying in the twentieth century
189
The medicalisation of death
191
Kylie Tennant and the war against cancer
206
Notes
371
Select Bibliography
390
Index
397
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