Brooklyn: A Novel

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Simon and Schuster, 2009 - Fiction - 262 pages
First published in hardcover to vigorous praise, Colm Toibin's New York Times bestselling novel is about a young Irish immigrant in Brooklyn in the early 1950s.

“One of the most unforgettable characters in contemporary literature” (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette), Eilis Lacey has come of age in small-town Ireland in the hard years following World War Two. When an Irish priest from Brooklyn offers to sponsor Eilis in America, she decides she must go, leaving her fragile mother and her charismatic sister behind.



Eilis finds work in a department store on Fulton Street, and when she least expects it, finds love. Tony, who loves the Dodgers and his big Italian family, slowly wins her over with patient charm. But just as Eilis begins to fall in love, devastating news from Ireland threatens the promise of her future.
 

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User Review  - nancyjean19 - LibraryThing

A very quiet but engaging book about a young woman from Ireland who moves to Brooklyn to find work -- AND HERSELF! I really enjoyed reading along as she gained confidence and recognized her own ... Read full review

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User Review  - gakgakg - LibraryThing

[Grumpy reader alert - Sorry this is so negative! I'm feeling really PMS'ed today and that may have something to do with it.] Summary: A boring story about a dull character that reads like an ... Read full review

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About the author (2009)

Colm Tóibín is the author of nine novels, including The Blackwater Lightship; The Master, winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize; Brooklyn, winner of the Costa Book Award; The Testament of Mary; and Nora Webster, as well as two story collections, and Mad, Bad, Dangerous to Know, a look at three nineteenth-century Irish authors. He is the Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia University. Three times shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, Tóibín lives in Dublin and New York.

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