A Different Universe: Reinventing Physics From the Bottom Down

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Basic Books, 31 jul. 2008 - 272 páginas
A Nobel-winning physicist argues that fundamental physical laws are found not in the world of atoms, but in the macroscopic world around us

In this age of superstring theories and Big Bang cosmology, we're used to thinking of the unknown as impossibly distant from our everyday lives. But in A Different Universe, Nobel Laureate Robert Laughlin argues that the scientific frontier is right under our fingers. Instead of looking for ultimate theories, Laughlin considers the world of emergent properties-meaning the properties, such as the hardness and shape of a crystal, that result from the organization of large numbers of atoms. Laughlin shows us how the most fundamental laws of physics are in fact emergent. A Different Universe is a truly mind-bending book that shows us why everything we think about fundamental physical laws needs to change.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Reseña de usuario  - klh - LibraryThing

Mostly an extended musing on the distinction between fundamental physical laws and emergent phenomena and how fuzzy, artificial, and misleading the distinction can be. Long on personal anecdotes ... Leer reseña completa

LibraryThing Review

Reseña de usuario  - thcson - LibraryThing

You would think that a book with the subtitle 'reinventing physics from the bottom down' would give a coherent presentation of how physics should be 'reinvented'. But no, this Nobel Prize winner ... Leer reseña completa

Índice

Title Page
TWO Living with Uncertainty
FOUR Water Ice and Vapor
SIX The Quantum Computer
EIGHT I Solved It at Dinner
NINE The Nuclear Family
TEN The Fabric of SpaceTime
TWELVE The Dark Side of Protection
FOURTEEN Star Warriors
SIXTEEN The Emergent
INDEX

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Sobre el autor (2008)

Robert B. Laughlin is the Robert M. and Anne Bass Professor of Physics at Stanford University, where he has taught since 1985. In 1998 he shared the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on the fractional quantum Hall effect. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He lives in Palo Alto, California.

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