Gibraltar, Identity and Empire

Portada
Psychology Press, 2006 - 233 páginas
0 Reseñas

The principal argument in Gibraltar and Empire is that Gibraltarians constitute a separate and distinctive people, notwithstanding the political stance taken by the government of Spain.

Various factors - environmental, ethnic, economic, political, religious, linguistic, educational and informal - are adduced to explain the emergence of a sense of community on the Rock and an attachment to the United Kingdom. A secondary argument is that the British empire has left its mark in Gibraltar in various forms - such as militarily - and for a number of reasons. Gilbraltar and Empire's exploration of the manifold reasons why the Gibraltarians have bucked the trend in the history of decolonization comes at a time when the issues in question have come to the fore in diplomatic and political areas.

  

Comentarios de usuarios - Escribir una reseña

No hemos encontrado ninguna reseña en los lugares habituales.

Índice

List of tables and figures
1
Changing contexts values and norms
9
Environmental aspects
26
Ethnic factors
34
Economic influences
51
Political and constitutional matters
72
Religion and the churches
93
Language and the community
107
A system born and reborn
115
Gibraltar takes control
137
Informal influences
153
The wider recreational and cultural scene
164
Concluding discussion
183
Página de créditos

Términos y frases comunes

Referencias a este libro

Sobre el autor (2006)

E. G. Archer has been successively teacher, head teacher and university lecturer at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow. He served as the Secretary of the Hispanic Society of Scotland for over thirteen years. A frequent visitor to Gibraltar, he co-authored Education in Gibraltar 1704-2004, and a book on the village of Catalan Bay.

Información bibliográfica